Century 21 North East - Norton Group RE



Posted by Century 21 North East - Norton Group RE on 6/23/2019

If you are planning to buy or sell a home soon, it is essential you know whether it is a buyer’s or seller’s market. But how do you determine that? 

Buyer’s Market

A buyer’s market is a situation where the supply of houses is higher than its demand, giving buyers an edge over the sellers in price negotiation. It is equally a situation where the available homes for sale exceed the number of buyers looking to buy homes. If you are considering buying a new home, then a buyer’s market is the right place to start as it is the perfect time to make that result-oriented moves. You might be able to buy a high-end property at a discounted price than you would buy in a seller’s market.

On the other hand, trying to sell your home on the buyer’s market will make your property languish in the market for an extended period of time before you can get a buyer as a result of a large pool of available homes in the market. Too much supply will cause you to reduce the listing price or offer some discounts to secure a buyer.

Seller’s Market

A seller’s market is also a situation where the demand for houses is greater than the supply. This means that there are too many buyers looking to purchase homes which are less than the available homes on the market. Invariably, there would be many buyers chasing after a few houses, which causes rivalry or price war among bidders.

A seller’s market is a place to sell your property as you could get a selling price that is bigger than your listing price since more people are looking to buy homes. Better still, you could secure a sales price that is higher - that is the bottom line.

Here, the seller has all the advantages over you if you are buying a property in the seller’s market. If other buyers are interested in the property you are bidding to buy, you might not succeed getting it at a lower price. You could even lose the opportunity of purchasing the property if another bidder offers a premium.

As a result of this singular reason, seller’s market is sometimes referred to as renter’s markets. Thus, prospective buyers will keep on renting until they save enough money that is larger than the down payment, then they can compete with other buyers in the market.

Different Markets, One Professional

Whether it is a seller’s or buyer’s market, a local real estate agent can assist you by bringing a plan for securing the best transaction. If you are buying a property, they will know the right amount of money you have to offer in order to compete favorably with other home buyers. Likewise, if you are selling, they will know exactly what price to ask for.Working with a trusted agent - who will not push you to offer what you are not prepared to, or rush you into making a hasty decision - is the key to getting the best deal in any of these markets.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Century 21 North East - Norton Group RE on 8/28/2016

Selling a home requires time, dedication and patience. As such, you need to be aware of the biggest dangers associated with selling a residence before you add your home to the real estate market; otherwise, you risk wasting your valuable time and resources. One of the biggest home selling dangers often remains ignored – self-sabotage. And if you're not careful, you may sabotage your chances of selling your residence without even realizing it's happening. So what can you do to avoid the danger of self-sabotaging your home sale? Here are three tips that home sellers can use to eliminate this risk altogether: 1. Be Realistic About the Price and Value of Your Home. Employ a professional appraiser to evaluate your home before you list it on the real estate market. By doing so, you'll be able to better understand what your home is worth and price it appropriately. Also, keep in mind that what you ask for your house may not be what homebuyers offer for your residence. For instance, in a seller's market, you might actually receive multiple offers that exceed your initial asking price. Conversely, in a buyer's market, you may wind up getting numerous offers at or below your original asking price. Regardless of whether you're selling your residence in a buyer's or seller's market, however, it is important to remain flexible. Ultimately, you need to feel comfortable with the initial asking price you set your house and the offers you receive for your residence, and only then will you be able to finalize an agreement that works well for both you and a homebuyer. 2. Act Fast on Any Offers You Receive. It is paramount to prepare for offers before they arrive, as this will enable you to act quickly and efficiently. Typically, you'll only have a short amount of time to decide whether to accept a homebuyer's proposal. And if you plan for prospective offers you'll receive, you can act confidently under duress. Consider how you'll respond if you receive an offer that meets or exceeds your initial asking price, along with how you'll respond to an offer that falls below your initial expectations. Because if you plan for the best- and worst-case scenarios, you'll be better equipped to minimize the chance of sabotaging a home sale. 3. Work with an Experienced Real Estate Agent. Collaborate with an experienced real estate agent, and you'll be able to prevent the risk of self-sabotage. A real estate agent will help you determine the best price for your home and get your residence ready for a home showing. Meanwhile, this professional likely will possess years of experience and ensure you understand the ins and outs of the real estate market, allowing you to make the best decisions possible relative to your home sale. Find the right real estate agent to sell your home – you'll be thrilled you did! With an expert real estate agent at your disposal, you'll be able to improve your chances of finding many interested homebuyers and getting multiple offers for your residence. Understand the danger of self-sabotage, and you can prevent this problem from arising as you attempt to sell your house.





Posted by Century 21 North East - Norton Group RE on 9/9/2012

Is it a seller's market? A buyer's market? Depends on the day and which media outlet you happen to be listening to. One thing is sure the market is changing. Here are some ways to know what kind of market it is: These are the signs of a buyer's market High inventory or more than six months of inventory currently on the market. Sale prices are higher than active listing prices. Lower closed sale numbers. Declining median sales prices. Higher DOM or days on the market. Here are some signs of a seller's market Low inventory or less than six months of inventory currently on the market. Sale prices are lower than active listing prices. Higher closed sale numbers. Increasing median sales prices. Lower DOM or days on the market. These are signs of a balanced market Three to six months of inventory is currently on the market. Sale prices are similar to active listing prices. Stable sales numbers. Flat median sales prices. Days active on the market are approximately 30 to 45 days. If you want to know how to figure out the months of inventory there is a simple way to do that. Take the total number of active listings and the total number of sold or closed transactions on the market last month. Divide the number of total listings by the number of total sales, which results in the number of months of inventory remaining. Then you can determine what type of market it is.